Glass Arrow, by Kristen Simmons | Book Review #221

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15750874In a world where females are scarce and are hunted, then bought and sold at market for their breeding rights, 15-year old Aya has learned how to hide. With a ragtag bunch of other women and girls, she has successfully avoided capture and eked out a nomadic but free existence in the mountains. But when Aya’s luck runs out and she’s caught by a group of businessmen on a hunting expedition, fighting to survive takes on a whole new meaning.


I am so glad that Glass Arrow is a stand-alone.

I had heard some good things about Glass Arrow on the internet, i.e., they liked it, or that the story is interesting.

Let me just say really quickly that I am so thankful that libraries are a thing. Continue reading

Ever the Hunted, by Erin Summerill | Book Review #220

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28114396-2Seventeen year-old Britta Flannery is at ease only in the woods with her dagger and bow. She spends her days tracking criminals alongside her father, the legendary bounty hunter for the King of Malam—that is, until her father is murdered. Now outcast and alone and having no rights to her father’s land or inheritance, she seeks refuge where she feels most safe: the Ever Woods. When Britta is caught poaching by the royal guard, instead of facing the noose she is offered a deal: her freedom in exchange for her father’s killer.

However, it’s not so simple.

The alleged killer is none other than Cohen McKay, her father’s former apprentice. The only friend she’s ever known. The boy she once loved who broke her heart. She must go on a dangerous quest in a world of warring kingdoms, mad kings, and dark magic to find the real killer. But Britta wields more power than she knows. And soon she will learn what has always made her different will make her a daunting and dangerous force.


Ever the Hunted is the first book in the Clash of Kingdoms duology/trilogy/series.

When I originally found Ever the Hunted on the internet, I couldn’t help but have high hopes and expectations for the story. While the book did have its interesting moments, but the story still fell flat as to my expectations.  Continue reading

Library Reads #28

libraryrreadsLibrary Reads: I’m a Library Lover, so these posts are where I document the books I’ve borrowed from either one library, of a few libraries. I’ll tell you a little bit about what I expect from the book, or the author’s writings. Whether what I say is a sentence long, or a few sentence’s. From doing these posts, I hope to spread a little of my love for libraries, while also informing you of books that you may or may not have known of!

One of my favourite things to do is borrow books from the library. I get to borrow a book, take it home, and read it. If I end up not liking, or I didn’t enjoy the book, then it’s not problem for me! I just return the book and move on with my life.

Here are the books that I’ve borrowed from the last half of May to end of June. Let me know if you’ve read, or want to read any of these books — Enjoy! Continue reading

TBR #34; Mental Illness & Ghosts

Screen Shot 2016-04-10 at 10.22.37 PMHello reader/s! I hope you’re well! For a while now, I’ve been writing a weekly or bi-weekly post about books that are on my TBR. TBR, if you don’t know is the abbreviation for To Be Read. My goal here is to shed some light on books that I’ve otherwise forgotten about. These books could be books I’ve been meaning to read from the library, or books that have been collecting dust on my shelves at home. My goal though is to say a little about the book and also give a little reasoning of why I want to read them. In hopes of reading them sooner than later.


Today’s TBR Tuesday will be about The Last Time We Say Goodbye by Cynthia Hand, and Second Glance by Jodi Picoult. Continue reading

Thirteen Reasons Why, by Jay Asher | Book Review #218

SHORT AND BRUTALLY HONEST REVIEW WITH PROFANITY.

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2813153You can’t stop the future. You can’t rewind the past. The only way to learn the secret. . . is to press play.

Clay Jensen doesn’t want anything to do with the tapes Hannah Baker made. Hannah is dead. Her secrets should be buried with her.

Then Hannah’s voice tells Clay that his name is on her tapes– and that he is, in some way, responsible for her death.

All through the night, Clay keeps listening. He follows Hannah’s recorded words throughout his small town. . .

. . .and what he discovers changes his life forever.’


Thirteen Reasons Why is a Realistic Fiction. There are a few triggers as well.

TRIGGER WARNING: Rape, Rape Mention, Bullying, Suicide.

Thirteen Reasons Why is not a book for those who have had thoughts of suicide, or knows someone who committed suicide, or even for those who have trauma surrounding suicide.  Continue reading

Books I DNF’d Part 3/?

dnfHello! Today’s post as you can read via the title is about the books I’ve marked as DNF. DNF stands for Did Not Finish. A little while ago I did my first “DNF” post. I thought that one would be my last.. Turns out, there are quite a few books that I’ve lost interest in, or for some reason they’ve failed to keep my attention.

Whether the book has caused me to lose interest, or I’m just not feeling the book at the moment.. There could be any amount of reasons why I didn’t finish a book. I could not like the writing, a character, or an event in the story that has caused me to stop reading.

As of late I’ve had a few more books that I’ve marked as DNF. Here they are!:


  • Fireblood by Jeff Wheeler

I started to read Fireblood by Jeff Wheeler. Ultimately, I couldn’t get into the story as much as I had wanted to, and DNF’d the story pretty early on into the book. The story didn’t grab  my attention as I hoped it would, even though there are some interesting facts about the main character. Which is completely upsetting because I wanted to like and get into this book. I really did. I just couldn’t though.

  • Last Seen Leaving by Caleb Roehrig

I really, really wanted to be able to get into reading Last Seen Leaving — And maybe someday I will. However, the first time ’round reading Last Seen Leaving, I just couldn’t get into the book at all. I really felt as that there was a block preventing me from reading ast Seen Leaving. I got 64 pages into the novel, and then flipped to the back of the book and read the last 30-50 pages of the ending.

  • A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness

It’s probably the images in the book that are putting me off. The story was interesting up until Conor relentlessly whined about his grandmother. I got to page 86 (42%).

  • Linked by Imogen Howson

While I initially was intrigued by the synopsis, it turns out that I didn’t like what I read! The book was moving too slowly for me to enjoy the book. I stopped reading at page 119 (33%).

  • Dreamstrider by Lindsay Smith

The early talk of a forbidden love has soured my optimism for the book. I may try and read this again at a later time, but for now I am happily marking this as DNF.

  • Aerie (Magonia, #2) by Maria Dahvana Headley

I don’t know what’s been up with me lately, but for some reason, I just can’t get into a few of the YA Fantasy books that I’ve been wanting to read? I don’t have the patience for how slow the book is unless the book starts with racing action, right from page one. However, trying to read Aerie made me realize that I don’t think I’m going to enjoy reading this second installation to the series — even though I’m interested in finding out what happens.

Are there any books that you’ve not finished lately? 

Happy Reading!
Adele

Scythe, by Neal Shusterman | Book Review #217

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28954189Thou shalt kill.

A world with no hunger, no disease, no war, no misery. Humanity has conquered all those things, and has even conquered death. Now scythes are the only ones who can end life—and they are commanded to do so, in order to keep the size of the population under control.

Citra and Rowan are chosen to apprentice to a scythe—a role that neither wants. These teens must master the “art” of taking life, knowing that the consequence of failure could mean losing their own.’


TRIGGER WARNING: Self Harm, Suicide, & Murder.

Scythe is the first book in the Arc of a Scythe duology? Trilogy? I don’t know.

In Scythe there are two different points of view. The first coming from Citra, and the second coming from Rowan. I didn’t know what to expect in Scythe, since it’s such a different kind of novel, where most of the worlds problems are solved. Almost like a Utopia kind of book. Yet the premise of Scythe contradicts my Utopian predictions.  Continue reading

Until We Meet Again, by Renee Collins | Book Review #216

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28755327Country clubs and garden parties. The last thing Cassandra wants is to spend the summer before her senior year marooned in a snooty Massachusetts shore town. Cass craves drama and adventure, which is hard when she just feels stuck.

But when a dreamy stranger shows up on her family’s private beach, claiming that it is his property-and that the year is 1925-Cass is swept into a mystery a hundred years in the making. As she searches for answers in the present, Cass discovers a truth that thrusts Lawrence’s life into jeopardy. It won’t matter which century he is from if he won’t live to see tomorrow.

Desperate to save the boy who’s come to mean everything to her, Cassandra must find a way to change history…or risk losing Lawrence forever.


A friend of mine recommended me Until We Meet Again, since I believe that she said that she ended up crying at the end. I’ve heard that a few people have ended up in tears by the end of the book.  Continue reading